Happy Birthday, Mies van der Rohe!

 An aspirational piece, indeed, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Couch (1930) was added to his Barcelona Collection in the year following the introduction of the Chair and Stool. Still produced to his original specifications, the couch gained widespread popularity in 1953, when architect Philip Johnson selected it for his New York apartment. The cushions – welting and buttons included – come from a single Spinneybeck Volo cowhide and are supported by cowhide belting straps. To create the deep, precise tufting, individual panels of leather are cut, hand-welted and hand-tufted. The frame is made from African mahogany sapele hardwood, with stainless steel legs. The bolster cushion is crafted from coordinating leather and secured to the couch with straps and locking snaps. The Barcelona Couch is a registered trademark of Knoll, Inc., manufactured by Knoll according to the original and exacting specifications of the designer. Made in U.S.A. Article via  Design Within Reach .

An aspirational piece, indeed, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Couch (1930) was added to his Barcelona Collection in the year following the introduction of the Chair and Stool. Still produced to his original specifications, the couch gained widespread popularity in 1953, when architect Philip Johnson selected it for his New York apartment. The cushions – welting and buttons included – come from a single Spinneybeck Volo cowhide and are supported by cowhide belting straps. To create the deep, precise tufting, individual panels of leather are cut, hand-welted and hand-tufted. The frame is made from African mahogany sapele hardwood, with stainless steel legs. The bolster cushion is crafted from coordinating leather and secured to the couch with straps and locking snaps. The Barcelona Couch is a registered trademark of Knoll, Inc., manufactured by Knoll according to the original and exacting specifications of the designer. Made in U.S.A. Article via Design Within Reach.

The modern city, with its towers of glass and steel, can be at least in part attributed to the influence of architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Equally significant, if smaller in scale, is Mies’ daring design of furniture, pieces that exhibit an unerring sense of proportion as well as minimalist forms and exquisitely refined details. In fact, his chairs have been called architecture in miniature – exercises in structure and materials that achieve an extraordinary visual harmony as autonomous pieces and in relation to the interiors for which they were designed.